Tag Archives: LockDown Browser

Online Proctoring: An Insider’s View

An interview with David Smetters, CEO of Respondus An excerpt of this interview originally published by  University Business, Feb. 2017. Online proctoring has taken off over the last 5 years. What are the main issues it attempts to solve? It’s really three things. First, and foremost, it’s trying to prevent students from cheating during an […]

Top Reasons to Use Respondus Applications

Sometimes we’re asked, “Why should I use your product?” Likewise, administrators or trainers frequently ask about the key benefits of our software to share with faculty or committees. Well, here’s an answer – actually, 10 of them. For each of our products we’ve created a top 10 list that describes the key benefits of the […]

LockDown Browser Available for Schoology

LockDown Browser is now available for the Schoology learning management system. Over 900 school districts and universities use LockDown Browser to prevents students from printing, copying, going to another URL, or accessing other applications during an online test. For non-proctored settings, Respondus Monitor adds webcam and video technology to LockDown Browser to ensure the integrity […]

Kick the Tires

Not that long ago instructional technologists could “kick the tires” of software applications without much effort. Today, the piloting of software can be laden with institutional policies like “funding must be secured before piloting” or “pilots can’t end in the middle of a term.” Then comes the 100-page RFP, legal review, accessibility testing, security analysis, […]

Anecdotal Evidence: 10 Points for Cheating

When you hear the words “anecdotal evidence” do you think someone is trying to turn a single data point into a theory? We share your skepticism. But hear us out on this, because this is something we keep hearing from customers. Put simply: when students take online exams in non-proctored environments (e.g. at home) using […]

A New LockDown Browser (ie. it’s not IE)

For the past 10 years the Windows version of LockDown Browser relied on Internet Explorer as its underlying engine. But when we saw that a better browser experience could be created with Chromium – the open source framework for Google Chrome — we decided to make the jump. Over 80 institutions have been using the beta release of the new browser based on Chromium for several months, with no major issues reported.